Depression, Anti Depressants, Antidepressant Medications

11 Nov

Bullied Children at high depression

Children are of different matures. Some children look very innocent but some children have very rude nature. They create problems for the others due to their mode and nature. In the research it is also found that Bullied children suffer from high risk of depression after their adulthood age. Lucy Bowes said, bullied children at the age of 18 years have doubled depression cases reported frequently. This is just the explanation of connection and not explaining the cause and effects.
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12 Jan

Depression Increases Preterm Delivery Risk

(Ivanhoe Newswire) — New research reveals there may be a significant link between depression during pregnancy and preterm delivery.

Preterm delivery (delivery at less than 37 weeks gestation) is the leading cause of infant mortality and morbidity. It’s also the leading reason behind medical expenditure for infants with estimated annual cost of $26 billion in the U.S. alone.

According to researchers at Kaiser Permanente, depressed pregnant women have twice the risk of preterm delivery than pregnant women with no signs of depression. During the study, which was among the first to examine the depression-preterm delivery link, researchers also found the risk grows with the severity of the depressive symptoms.

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05 Jan

Alzheimer’s Disease Not Susceptible to B Vitamins

SAN DIEGO, Oct. 14 — High-dose vitamin B supplements reduced homocysteine levels but did not slow Alzheimer’s disease progression, researchers here found in a large placebo-controlled trial.

After 18 months of treatment, patients taking high doses of vitamins B6 and B12 as well as folic acid showed the same degree of cognitive decline compared with baseline as those assigned to placebo, reported Paul Aisen, M.D., of the University of California San Diego, and colleagues in the Oct. 15 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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05 Jan

Depression During Pregnancy May Cause Premature Birth

THURSDAY, Oct. 23 — Women who are depressed early in their pregnancy run a higher risk of preterm delivery, the leading cause of infant mortality, a new study suggests.

For the study, researchers interviewed 791 San Francisco-area women near their 10th week of pregnancy. Forty-one percent reported “significant” symptoms of depression, and 22 percent reported “severe” symptoms.

Those women with severe symptoms had almost twice the risk of an early birth, defined as before 37 weeks’ gestation. Those with significant symptoms had a 60 percent risk of early birth, the study found.

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05 Jan

Depression in pregnancy tied to preterm birth

By Amy Norton

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Women with depression symptoms early in pregnancy may be at heightened risk of delivering prematurely, a study published Thursday suggests.

Researchers found that among 791 pregnant women they followed, those who were suffering from significant depression symptoms around the 10th week of pregnancy were twice as likely as non-depressed women to give birth too early.

What’s more, the risk of preterm delivery rose in tandem with the severity of early-pregnancy depression — supporting a direct relationship between the two.

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04 Jan

Preterm Delivery May Be Linked To Depression

A survey says that about 10 to 20% of pregnant women show some symptoms of depression and that a quarter to half of these women is likely to suffer from a major depression. The latest findings in this area suggest that depression in pregnant women can cause preterm delivery of the baby, which is, statistically, the main cause of infant mortality in the U.S. The research was published in the medical journal Human Reproduction and it clearly states that depression in pregnant women is clearly under rated and under diagnosed. The study shows that the major the depression symptoms the more chances of a preterm delivery of the baby.

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04 Jan

Pfizer Halts Phase III Trial On Obesity Drug Over US Rejection Fears

Pfizer Inc., the world?s largest drugmaker, on Wednesday said it abandoned an obesity drug known only by the designation CP-945,598 ? not specifically for safety concerns but because of ?changing regulatory perspectives on the risk/benefit profile of the CB1 class and likely new regulatory requirements for approval.?

?While confident in the safety of the compound, we believe that this is the appropriate decision based on all available information regarding this class of agents, as well as recent discussions with regulatory authorities,? Martin Mackay, president of Pfizer Global Research and Development, said in a statement.

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